From Princess to Queen: the evolution of the Feminine.

In an earlier Blog, I posited the notion that the Princess Zezolla had brought about her own ‘descent’ to the cinders, in the story of Cenerentola.  Her act was similar to the act of burning the frogskin, in the story of the Frog Princess. Zezolla had in fact ‘burned’ her previous life as a princess, to sit amongst the ashes of this life, to quietly work on herself, amongst the cinders.

Someone in a recent workshop, was very disturbed by this and really disliked and resented the princess for, using, manipulating, and even tricking the men in her life, like her father, and even the servant of the King, so as to promote her own evolution.

This caused some interesting discussion in the group and, so I would like address this and  delve more deeply into this topic, as it is in fact very important.

In the opening scene of the story, Princess Zezolla is mourning the death of her beloved mother. Her father the prince adores her and sees the world through her eyes only. This is a telling phrase – for it is not appropriate for a father and a prince to see the world from the vantage of his young daughter, who represents his soul. He no longer has a mature and evolved feminine side or soul.

This would appear to reflect an aspect of the patriarchy which sees the feminine as young, childlike, and virginal. It is not fashionable to be rounded and voluptuous of body; women try to look like young girls, even when they could be grandmothers. This really infantilises the feminine and is open to issues of power and control of the feminine by the masculine.

It reminds me of a male friend who used to smile benignly at my interest in mysticism and the inner life. I was metaphorically patted on the head and told to go out and ‘play’. It was patronising, and the relationship could not sustain this attitude. The patriarchy is afraid of a fully evolved and powerful feminine, like the Goddess Freya, or even Hestia.

So there is something in the Prince (Zezolla’s father) who allowed the glorious feminine side of him to die. In this way Zezolla ‘lost’ her mother. The only thing for her to do was to disallow her father to ‘use’ her in this way, by  projecting his ‘soul’ onto his daughter.

Thus Zezolla persuaded her father the prince, to marry her nurse / governess – this would seem to be an appropriate match for him, given his level of evolution. He was not up to marrying a princess, although a prince should really marry a princess. Perhaps this is also a reflection of the patriarchy.

Zezolla, in truth, has ‘burned’ this part of her life, so that she could be free to develop and evolve in her own way, to become the Queen she really is. This is her way of burning the frog-skin.

All characters in this story are aspects of the one, of Zezolla herself, and so of us all. The feminine must not be seen and related to as a young, innocent girl, to be bought off with trinkets, lovely food and pretty clothes. Neither must the feminine in us be used, like the trophy wife in the Frog Princess story. The frog-skin, in the life of a virgin daughter must be totally disposed of – burned, so that she can sit amongst the ashes or cinders, in the central hearth or heart, as ‘Cenerentola’, totally herself, without pretences, without airs and graces, in mastery of her self, her ego. In this way, by doing her daily practice, which was given to her by her Teacher – The Dove of the Fairies, she becomes Queen and is recognised as such by the young King. Note that she becomes a Queen in her own right and not simply because she has married a King.

The masculine must not be allowed to dominate and control, and take over the process, as the young prince did, in burning his wife’s frog skin, in the story of the Frog Princess.

 

 

2 thoughts on “From Princess to Queen: the evolution of the Feminine.

  1. Dear Nuria, thank you for the continuing exploration. Another way of seeing the death of Zezolla’s mother is : the birth of the independence of the soul, no longer tied to the Source from which we come. Then the descent into the ashes is a perfectly clear picture of every soul’s descent into the world of hard labour and limitation. What makes Zezolla remarkable is that her exile becomes her apprenticeship, and she becomes able to reclaim her royal nature. The ancient Hindus called hardship endured for spiritual purposes ‘tapasya’, meaning purification by fire, and it was the practice of some yogis to go and sit among the cinders of the cremation grounds as a way of mastering themselves.

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